Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection Retrospective Series – Street Fighter III | PS4

Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection Retrospective Series – Street Fighter III | PS4

Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection Retrospective Series – Street Fighter III | PS4

https://www.playstation.com/en-us/games/street-fighter-30th-anniversary-collection-ps4/

Learn more about the Street Fighter III series with this retrospective video! Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection is now available on PlayStation 4 and contains 12 iconic titles in the series that each have their place in Street Fighter history!

https://streetfighter.com/street-fighter-30th-anniversary-collection/

Source: Playstation YouTube






Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 17686

Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 17686

Hello Windows Insiders!

Today, we are releasing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 17686 (RS5) to Windows Insiders in the Fast ring in addition to those who opted in to Skip Ahead.

What’s new in Build 17686

Improved Local Experience

We have introduced a new Region page that allows overrides to default regional format settings such as Calendar, First day of the week, Dates, Times, and Currency. Please go to Settings App – Time & Language – Region and give it a try.

Region Page in Settings app.

Local Experience Packs are Microsoft Store apps that deliver Windows display language quality improvements. You can now access them easily via the Settings App. Please go to Settings App – Time & Language – Language. Once here click on Add a Windows display language with Local Experience Packs link to download a Local Experience Pack from the Microsoft Store and start enjoying Windows in your preferred language.

Acquire Local Experience Packs from Settings app’s Language page.

Privacy Improvements

We wanted to let you know that if access to the microphone has been disabled in your privacy settings, we’ll now pop a notification the first time an attempt to use the microphone is blocked so you can review the settings if desired.

Notification showing “Your privacy settings blocked access to the microphone. Review these privacy settings”.

Windows Mixed Reality Improvements

This build includes several improvements for Windows Mixed Reality users:

  • This build no longer requires a physical monitor to be connected while running Mixed Reality in cases such as backpack PCs. Setting up WMR for the first time in Mixed Reality Portal and unlocking the PC on the sign in screen still, require a monitor to be connected initially. However, you can configure auto login to prevent needing to sign in for subsequent usage here. Using Windows Mixed Reality while standing requires setting up a room boundary.
  • Apps running in Windows Mixed Reality can now make use of the Camera Capture UI API to capture images of the mixed reality world using the system capture experience. Try running Mail in the Cliff House and inserting an image from your camera in a new message to share an image of the scenic view.
  • We’ve also made some adjustments to the mixed reality video capture experience in this build to make it easier to stop videos from the Start menu.

General changes, improvements, and fixes for PC

  • We fixed an issue resulting in frequent bugchecks on the previous build with CRITICAL_PROCESS_DIED error.
  •  Settings > Gaming > Game DVR has been renamed “Captures”.
  • We fixed an issue where Paint and WordPad settings and recent files weren’t migrated during upgrades.
  • While we still have some work to do, you’ll find that when you update to this build, File Explorer will look a lot more complete in dark theme.
  • We fixed an issue resulting in the “Replace or skip files” dialog having some unexpected dark elements in recent flights.
  • We fixed an issue where the Japanese IME’s big mode indicator would appear in the center of the screen when bringing up UAC even if the mode indicator had been disabled in Settings.
  • We fixed an issue where the taskbar flyouts (network, volume, etc) didn’t have a shadow.
  • We fixed an issue where clicking on the plus button in the Clock and Calendar flyout from the taskbar didn’t do anything in recent flights.
  • We fixed an issue resulting in Command Prompt’s cursor appearing invisible in the last few flights.
  • We fixed an issue resulting in a high number of reliability issues when switching to the Microsoft Pinyin IME in recent flights.
  • We fixed an issue where the Emoji Panel might not dismiss if you clicked somewhere else on the screen.

Known issues

  • We’re working on adding dark theme in File Explorer and the Common File Dialog, but we still have some things to do. You may see some unexpectedly light colors in these surfaces when in dark mode.
  • After update, Mixed Reality Portal will reinstall the Mixed Reality Software and environment settings will not be preserved. If you need your Mixed Reality home experience to persist, we recommend skipping this build until these issues are fixed.
  • Some Insiders may find increased reliability and performance issues when launching Start on this build. We’re investigating.
  • Fonts acquired from Microsoft Store may not work in some apps.
  • When you upgrade to this build you’ll find that the taskbar flyouts (network, volume, etc) no longer have an acrylic background.
  • There is a bug in this build (and in Build 17682) that will impact driver testing scenarios. When executing HLK Component/Device driver tests, you may experience a bug check that blocks test execution. We are aware of the issue and actively working on a fix.
  • If you install any of the recent builds from the Fast ring and switch to the Slow ring – optional content such as enabling developer mode will fail. You will have to remain in the Fast ring to add/install/enable optional content. This is because optional content will only install on builds approved for specific rings. There has not yet been a RS5 build released to the Slow ring.

Known issues for Sets & Office

  • Sets UX for Office Win32 desktop apps is not final. The experience will be refined over time based on feedback.
  • The top of some Win32 desktop app windows may appear slightly underneath the tab bar when created maximized. To work around the issue, restore and re-maximize the window.
  • Closing one tab may sometimes minimize the entire set.
  • Tiling and cascading windows, including features like “View Side by Side” in Word, will not work for inactive tabs.
  • The Office Visual Basic Editor window will currently be tabbed but is not intended to be in the future.
  • Opening an Office document while the same app has an existing document open may cause an unintended switch to the last active document. This will also happen when closing a sheet in Excel while other sheets remain open.
  • Local files or non-Microsoft cloud files will not be automatically restored, and no error message will be provided to alert the user to that fact.

REMINDER: Upcoming Bug Bash

We are excited to announce the dates for the next Bug Bash: June 22nd – July 1st. And we will hold a Bug Bash Webcast on our Mixer channel on June 27th – exact timing will be announced closer to the date. We’re excited to do another Bug Bash with our Windows Insiders!

No downtime for Hustle-As-A-Service,
Dona <3

Source: Windows Blog






C# Console UWP Applications

C# Console UWP Applications

We’ve just published an update to the Console UWP App project templates on the Visual Studio marketplace here. The latest version (v1.5) adds support for C#. The C# template code only works with Visual Studio 2017 version 15.7 or later. In a previous post, I described how to build a simple findstr UWP app using the C++ Console templates. In this post, we’ll look at how to achieve the same with C#, and call out a few additional wrinkles you should be aware of.

Having installed the updated VSIX, you can now choose a C# Console UWP App from the New Project dialog:

choose a C# Console UWP App from the New Project dialog

Note that C# console apps are only supported from version 10.0.17134.0 of the platform. You should therefore specify a version >= 10.0.17134 for the minimum platform version when you create your project. If you forget this step, you can fix it at any time later by manually editing your .csproj and updating the TargetPlatformMinVersion value. 

If you forget this step, you can fix it at any time later by manually editing your .csproj and updating the TargetPlatformMinVersion value.

Also note that with the C# template, you might get the error message “Output type ‘Console Application’ is not supported by one or more of the project’s targets.” You can safely ignore this message – even though it is flagged as an error, it doesn’t actually make any difference to anything and doesn’t prevent the project from building correctly.

As with the C++ template, the generated code includes a Main method. One difference you’ll notice with the C# version is that the command-line arguments are passed directly into Main. Recall that in the C++ version, you don’t get the arguments into main, but instead you need to use the global __argc and __argv variables. Notice that you can also now use the System.Console APIs just as you would in a non-UWP console app.


static void Main(string[] args) 
{ 
    if (args.Length == 0) 
    { 
        Console.WriteLine("Hello - no args"); 
    } 
    else 
    { 
        for (int i = 0; i < args.Length; i++) 
        { 
            Console.WriteLine($"arg[{i}] = {args[i]}"); 
        } 
    } 
    Console.WriteLine("Press a key to continue: "); 
    Console.ReadLine(); 
} 

As before, for the file-handling behavior needed for the findstr app, you need to add the broadFileSystemAccess restricted capability. Adding this will cause your app to get some extra scrutiny when you submit it to the Store. You will need to describe how you intend to use the feature, and show that your usage is reasonable and legitimate. 


xmlns:rescap="http://schemas.microsoft.com/appx/manifest/foundation/windows10/restrictedcapabilities"  
  IgnorableNamespaces="uap mp uap5 desktop4 iot2 rescap"> 
… 
  <Capabilities> 
    <Capability Name="internetClient" /> 
    <rescap:Capability Name="broadFileSystemAccess" /> 
  </Capabilities> 

Because the app will be doing some simple file handling and pattern matching, in the C++ version, I had to #include the Windows.Storage.h and regex, and declare the corresponding namespaces. In C#, you need the equivalent Windows.Storage and System.Text.RegularExpressions namespaces.

For the findstr functionality, recall that I’m expecting a command-line such as “CsFindstr foo C:Bar”, where “foo” is the pattern to search for, and “C:Bar” is the folder location from which to start the recursive search. I can strip out all the generated code in Main, and replace it with firstly a simple test for the expected number of command-line arguments, and secondly a call to a RecurseFolders method (which I’ll write in a minute). In the C++ version, I tested __argc < 3, but in the managed version I need to test the incoming args.Length for < 2 (the executable module name itself is not included in the C# args).


static void Main(string[] args) 
{ 
    if (args.Length < 2) 
    { 
        Console.WriteLine("Insufficient arguments."); 
        Console.WriteLine("Usage:"); 
        Console.WriteLine("   mFindstr <search-pattern> <fully-qualified-folder-path>."); 
        Console.WriteLine("Example:"); 
        Console.WriteLine("   mFindstr on D:Temp."); 
    } 
    else 
    { 
        string searchPattern = args[0]; 
        string folderPath = args[1]; 
        RecurseFolders(folderPath, searchPattern).Wait(); 
    } 
 
    Console.WriteLine("Press a key to continue: "); 
    Console.ReadLine(); 
} 

Now for the custom RecurseFolders method. Inside this method, I need to use a number of async methods for the file handling, so the method needs to be declared async – and this is also why I called Wait() on the Task return from the method back up in Main. I can’t make Main async, so I must make sure to contain all meaningful async return values within the lower-level methods.

In this method, I’ll get the StorageFolder for the root folder supplied by the user on the command-line, get the files in this folder, and then continue down the folder tree for all sub-folders and their files:


private static async Task<bool> RecurseFolders(string folderPath, string searchPattern) 
{ 
    bool success = true; 
    try 
    { 
        StorageFolder folder = await StorageFolder.GetFolderFromPathAsync(folderPath); 
 
        if (folder != null) 
        { 
            Console.WriteLine( 
                $"Searching folder '{folder}' and below for pattern '{searchPattern}'"); 
            try 
            { 
                // Get the files in this folder. 
                IReadOnlyList<StorageFile> files = await folder.GetFilesAsync(); 
                foreach (StorageFile file in files) 
                { 
                    SearchFile(file, searchPattern); 
                } 
 
                // Recurse sub-directories. 
                IReadOnlyList<StorageFolder> subDirs = await folder.GetFoldersAsync(); 
                if (subDirs.Count != 0) 
                { 
                    GetDirectories(subDirs, searchPattern); 
                } 
            } 
            catch (Exception ex) 
            { 
                success = false; 
                Console.WriteLine(ex.Message); 
            } 
        } 
    } 
    catch (Exception ex) 
    { 
        success = false; 
        Console.WriteLine(ex.Message); 
    } 
    return success; 
} 

The GetDirectories method is the actual recursive method that performs the same operation (get the files in the current folder, then recurse sub-folders): 


private static async void GetDirectories(IReadOnlyList<StorageFolder> folders, string searchPattern) 
{ 
    try 
    { 
        foreach (StorageFolder folder in folders) 
        { 
            // Get the files in this folder. 
            IReadOnlyList<StorageFile> files = await folder.GetFilesAsync(); 
            foreach (StorageFile file in files) 
            { 
                SearchFile(file, searchPattern); 
            } 
 
            // Recurse this folder to get sub-folder info. 
            IReadOnlyList<StorageFolder> subDirs = await folder.GetFoldersAsync(); 
            if (subDirs.Count != 0) 
            { 
                GetDirectories(subDirs, searchPattern); 
            } 
        } 
    } 
    catch (Exception ex) 
    { 
        Console.WriteLine(ex.Message); 
    } 
} 

Finally, the SearchFile method, which is where I’m doing the pattern-matching, using Regex. As before, I’m enhancing the raw search pattern to search for any whitespace-delimited “word” that contains the user-supplied pattern. Then I walk the returned MatchCollection, and print out all the found “words” and their position in the file. 


private static async void SearchFile(StorageFile file, string searchPattern) 
{ 
    if (file != null) 
    { 
        try 
        { 
            Console.WriteLine($"Scanning file '{file.Path}'"); 
            string text = await FileIO.ReadTextAsync(file); 
            string compositePattern =  
                "(S+s+){0}S*" + searchPattern + "S*(s+S+){0}"; 
            Regex regex = new Regex(compositePattern); 
            MatchCollection matches = regex.Matches(text); 
            foreach (Match match in matches) 
            { 
                Console.WriteLine($"{match.Index,8} {match.Value}"); 
            } 
        } 
        catch (Exception ex) 
        { 
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message); 
        } 
    } 
} 

With this, I can now press F5 to build and deploy the app. For console apps it often makes sense to set the Debug properties to “Do not launch, but debug my code when it starts” – because the most useful testing will be done with varying command-line arguments, and therefore by launching the app from a command prompt rather from Visual Studio. 

For console apps it often makes sense to set the Debug properties to “Do not launch, but debug my code when it starts.”

I can test the app using a command window or powershell window: 

Test the app using a command window or powershell window

That’s it! You can now write Console UWP apps in C#. Full source code for this sample app is on Github here. 

Source: Windows Blog






Shift Your Imagination with Shift Quantum’s Level Editor on Xbox One

Shift Your Imagination with Shift Quantum’s Level Editor on Xbox One

At last! Today marks the long-awaited launch of Shift Quantum, our cyber-noir puzzle platformer, which is the dystopian brainchild of us folks at Fishing Cactus and Red Panda Interactive.

We wanted Shift Quantum to be more than just a puzzle game, where we aim to draw you into the world, give you purpose and ask questions. Shift Quantum’s core creates perspective duality by inverting the world between black and white, but we wanted to deliver this conflicting two-sided existence beyond more than just the aesthetics.

Shift Quantum Screenshot

Shift Quantum Screenshot

During development, we paid particular attention to the details; making it an interesting, rewarding and challenging experience. Shift Quantum’s Level Editor is not just a tool, it is part of the detail that brings the story to life.

When you play Shift Quantum, you participate in the Axon Vertigo’s experience. When you use the Level Editor to create your own puzzle challenges, you are no longer as an experimental subject, instead, you put yourself into the shoes of an employee of Axon Vertigo creating cerebral progression levels for the Shift Quantum program. Just like our game designers when they created all 117 levels of the game.

Shift Quantum Screenshot

Shift Quantum Screenshot

The wide variety of gameplay blocks associated with the shift mechanic is an open door to creativity and head-scratching solutions. You will be able to conceive your own crazy levels, share them with communities to be played and receive a level rating. The higher and more ratings you get, the top of Axon Vertigo’s best level page you will go.

We needed the tool to be very user-friendly and easy to pick up and to guide you in your first steps, Mary from Axon Vertigo has provided a preview video on how it all works. Remember we are delivering happiness to all subjects, so have fun!

See the rest of the story on Xbox Wire

Related:
E3 2018: Explore a Hand-Crafted Solar System in Outer Wilds, Coming Soon to Xbox One
Xbox One Storytellers: Dontnod Entertainment on Vampyr
Putting the Madness in The Infectious Madness of Doctor Dekker, Available Now on Xbox One

Source: Xbox Blog






E3 2018: Explore a Hand-Crafted Solar System in Outer Wilds, Coming Soon to Xbox One

E3 2018: Explore a Hand-Crafted Solar System in Outer Wilds, Coming Soon to Xbox One

Outer Wilds is an open world mystery where you explore a solar system trapped in a 20-minute time loop. Over the last three years, our development team has grown far beyond the initial few who worked on the alpha when it was a student project, but our main priority has always been to support the original vision for the game.

Outer Wilds Screenshot

Outer Wilds Screenshot

Inspired by the unusual combination of backpacking through national parks and the dangers of the vast darkness of space, Outer Wilds is a game about exploring for the sake of curiosity. We have created a hand-crafted solar system filled with secrets to discover and perils to avoid, using dynamic physics simulation to add to the thrill of exploring space. Players are given a variety of tools to aid in space-backpacking: including their own spaceship and jetpack; a surveyor probe for scouting and taking pictures; and a signal scope to track down audio signals as well as view landmarks from afar.

Outer Wilds Screenshot

Outer Wilds Screenshot

Moment-to-moment, the goal of Outer Wilds is to give players the experience of being an astronaut exploring a new and unusual frontier. Players can explore ancient ruins to uncover the secrets of a lost civilization and form hypothesis about their discoveries. Pathways across planets are filled with unique and dangerous phenomena to overcome.

Outer Wilds Screenshot

Outer Wilds Screenshot

Through a greater understanding of these systems, players can reach new locations to uncover even more hidden knowledge and delve deeper into the grand mysteries hidden in the farthest reaches of Outer Wilds.

Outer Wilds Screenshot

Outer Wilds Screenshot

After all these years in development, we are very excited to release Outer Wilds later this year!

For more information check out our announcement trailer above or head to outerwilds.com. And keep your signal scopes tuned to Xbox Wire for future news about Outer Wilds and other great games coming soon to Xbox One.

See the rest of the story on Xbox Wire

Related:
Shift Your Imagination with Shift Quantum’s Level Editor on Xbox One
Xbox One Storytellers: Dontnod Entertainment on Vampyr
Putting the Madness in The Infectious Madness of Doctor Dekker, Available Now on Xbox One

Source: Xbox Blog